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Monthly Archives: September 2013

Kate Moss: muse to art and music

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With a dedicated art auction at Christie’s and a mash-up of her voice in a new song, it seems no one is immune to the allure of Kate Moss.

Kate Moss’ name keeps popping up in our news feed.

First, it’s the song, ‘Day and All Night’ produced by Canadian DJ Brendan Fallis and songwriter Andrew Watt. The lyrics are actually appropriated Kate Moss sound bites from a recent video she filmed for Stuart Weitzman.

The Vogue cover girl is no foreigner to music – remember her vocals in Primal Scream’s Some Velvet Morning?

The shoe brand invited Fallis to pull Moss’ voice from its ‘Made for Walking’ autumn/winter ‘13/’14 campaign to create what has been described by the brand as a “music mash-up”.

The electro song (which also features a saxophone solo) repeats Moss saying phrases like “I think thigh-high boots are especially sexy and glamorous,” “driving in a posh car day and night,” and “people are a bit shocked to see me walking down the street”.

Have a listen yourself here.

In other Moss-related news, a collection of art featuring the supermodel has fetched £1.7 million at a Christie’s auction.

60 works by Irving Penn, Mario Testino, Chuck Close, Allen Jones and Annie Leibovitz, among others, were put up for auction by a German collector, Gert Elfering.

Before the collection went under the hammer, Elfering said, “Kate is the ultimate modern muse and we will be seeing her images in major museums and private collections for years to come.”

The highest price reached for a single artwork was £133 875 for a life-size glass sculpture entitled ‘A Model Model’ by UK pop artist Allen Jones. Irving Penn’s ‘Kate Moss (hand on thigh)’ was the top-selling photograph (at £61 875). The black-and-white was originally taken for the September 1996 issue of US Vogue.

With her imminent Playboy cover, it seems this icon isn’t tiring (or retiring) any time soon.

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Kate Moss Collection auction raises over £1.6 million

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As one of the most photographed models in the world, Kate Moss gave her blessing to the sale, which, unsurprisingly, “attracted worldwide attention and admiration” according to Philippe Garner, Christie’s international head of photographs.

The collection of mostly photographs and several artworks of the 39-year-old throughout her career were amassed by Gert Elfering, a German photographer, gallery-owner and long term collector of photographic art.

The artwork which fetched the most was a sculpture of Moss measuring 185cm in height by Allen Jones. Numbered one of just six editions, the glass-reinforced composite, titled ‘A model Model’, was created only this year. It was sold for £133,875. Jones’s oil painting, ‘Kate in red’, also from 2013, was the second-highest grossing item at £121,875.

In the pre-lot text, Allen was quoted as saying: “As a model, Kate has become a commodity. For the media she is news, and for artists she is now subject matter.”

Chris Levine’s ‘She’s Light’ (main picture), a chromogenic lenticular image of a naked Moss in a light-box, fetched £115,875, setting a world record price for the artist.

In total, from 48 lots, the auction made £1,665,500.

Photographers Craig McDean and Mario Sorrenti also realised new world records for the price of their work. McDean’s iconic photo of Moss wearing a khaki parka inscribed with God Save The Queen (below) for the June 2002 issue of i-D magazine fetched £49,875. Sorrenti’s black and white image of Moss lying naked on a sofa, taken while the two were a couple in 1992 for the Calvin Klein Obsession campaign, realised a price of £49,875.

 

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Bianca Balti after Dolce and Gabbana show, Milano, September 2013

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Posted by on September 22, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Summer is over, but the simple T-shirt is still the most important item – By David Gandy

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Last week, I persuaded my nephew to help me to give the Jag a wash (yes, I finally found a use for him – and people say child labour is wrong).

First, we went to get changed into some old clothes that wouldn’t get ruined by the inevitable water fight that would break out later. I handed the boy an old T-shirt of his with a big cartoon character on the front, only for him to say: “It’s just not cool, Uncle David, I can’t wear that.” He’s nine years old.

This got me thinking about T-shirts, and about the way British males dress in general (and how our continental friends are inclined to dress far better than we do). In the UK, there is still a real dress-down culture that is dominated by ill-fitting T-shirts with comedy slogans, ironic pictures, funny graphics or huge logos emblazoned on them.

I’m not talking about children or even teenagers here, I’m talking about grown men. As I sit here writing this in a coffee shop in west London (oh God, I’m not turning into Carrie Bradshaw, am I?), there’s a guy wearing a pink T-shirt with Star Wars Storm Troopers on the front of it, and I’m just thinking, “Why?”

Presumably, he thinks it’s cool, and that other people will think the same, and will share his nostalgia for old sci-fi films, plus his sense of fun. He possibly thinks a pink Star Wars T-shirt is pretty witty.

The British sense of humour is, to me, the best in the world – however, almost any attempt at humour on the front of a T-shirt falls flat on its face. It’s lost on me. It seems it’s also lost on my nine-year old nephew who has grown out of funny, cartoon T-shirts in favour of something more simple and sharp. In that respect his grasp of style is more evolved than many grown men I’ve encountered. Maybe it’s something to do with his Spanish blood?

What isn’t lost on me, though, is the versatility of the classic T-shirt.

Simply put, it should be the main staple in any man’s wardrobe. I’m a huge advocate of men’s tailoring and bespoke suits, and I always say that men’s wardrobes should be based around tailoring, because compared to women we have a rather limited selection of items to choose from.

The items I wear the most, however, are T-shirts. During this hot summer, I have primarily been seen in a pair of tailored trousers and a T-shirt. Alone, this combination doesn’t necessarily work, but with the right shoes, watch and sunglasses, it makes for a simple, effective, smart and stylish ensemble.

T-shirts are adaptable to any outfit. I wear one under my double-breasted suit jackets so they look a lot less formal. If you want to show off a leather or driving jacket, a simple T-shirt cannot be beaten.

For such a humble garment, the T-shirt has been sported by many of the biggest male style icons and fashion influencers in history. Think Marlon Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire, or Paul Newman in Eve Arnold’s famous photo of him at the Actors Studio in the mid 50s, or James Dean at the wheel of his Porsche Spyder (all of them looking effortlessly stylish in a plain white tee). Google images of Giorgio Armani, one of the great men’s fashion designers, and I promise you that half of them will show him in a plain black T-shirt.

Today’s style icons like a simple T-shirt too. David Beckham wears a plain tee and jeans arguably better than anybody. Ryan Gosling, in his latest films – “The Place Beyond the Pines” and “Only God Forgives” – looks great in loose crew T-shirts, adapted either with the sleeves cut off or slightly rolled.

T-shirts can be used to great styling effect, but it’s not as easy as it sounds. There isn’t just one style: there are loose crew necks, regular crew necks, normal V necks, deep V necks, slim fitting T-shirts, wide bodied T-shirts, long sleeved, short sleeved, mid length sleeved. This is where the buyer has to choose the correct fit and style for their body type.

I personally never buy a regular neck T-shirt – they will always be loose or deeper cut and I’ll usually go for a slightly longer sleeve. And they are always from American Apparel, which stocks every type of T-shirt you could ever need – every cut, every style and every colour.

Choose the one that’s right for you. But remember just one thing, gentlemen. Before you head out to re-stock, there’s one common factor that makes a T-shirt a classic. No logos, no writing, no jokes, no images. As my nephew knows full well, it has to be PLAIN.

 

 
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Posted by on September 18, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Blogged : From the starriest front rows at New York #Fashion Week #NYFW

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Marc Jacobs show – September 12 2013

Winona Ryder, Christina Ricci and Parker Posey.
 
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Michael Kors show – September 11 2013

Kate Mara and Katie Holmes, both wearing Michael Kors.
 
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Michael Kors show – September 11 2013

Harley Viera-Newton in Michael Kors.
 
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Reed Krakoff show – September 11 2013

Julianne Moore and her 11-year-old daughter Liv.
 
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September 11 2013

Karolina Kurkova and Karlie Kloss.
 
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Rachel Zoe show – September 11 2013

Olivia Palermo wore a Tibi shirt with a Scanlan & Theodore skirt, Westward Leaning shades, Truth or Dare by Madonna heels and carried a Smythson bag.
 
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Rachel Zoe show – September 11 2013

Poppy Delevingne.

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Rachel Zoe show – September 11 2013

Rachel Zoe backstage at her show with her son Skyler and actress Holland Roden.

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Victoria Victoria Beckham presentation – September 10 2013

Victoria Beckham.
 
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Vera Wang show – September 10 2013

Olivia Palermo wore a shirt and skirt by Willow, a Tibi jacket, Giuseppe Zanotti heels and carried a Reiss clutch.

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Sunglass Hut store launch – September 10 2013

Harley Viera-Newton.

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Narcisco Rodriguez show – September 10 2013

Jessica Alba in a Narciso Rodriguez dress and Jimmy Choo heels.

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Tory Burch show – September 10 2013

Rashida Jones wore a Tory Burch dress from the pre-spring/summer 2013 collection.

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DKNY’s 25th birthday party – September 9 2013

Karlie Kloss.

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DKNY’s 25th birthday party – September 9 2013

Rita Ora.

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DKNY’s 25th birthday party – September 9 2013

Hailee Steinfeld.Image
 

DKNY’s 25th birthday party – September 9 2013

Joan Smalls.
 
 

 

 
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Posted by on September 13, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

#Vogue: fashion shoots aren’t real

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Their skin is flawless, their make-up perfect and their hair sleek, but to teenage girls hoping to emulate fashion models, British Vogue has a message – it’s not real.

 

The magazine has made a short film revealing the work required to create fashion shoots, from the teams of make-up artists and stylists, to the digital enhancement and lighting.

It will be distributed free to 13-year-olds in British schools this week in a bid to reassure young people worried about their appearance that nobody looks that good in real life.

“I decided it might be helpful to show what goes into the creation of a Vogue fashion picture, as a way of illustrating the skill and artifice that makes the final product,” said Alexandra Shulman, editor of British Vogue.

She added: “Our mission in Vogue’s fashion pictures is to inspire and entertain while showing the clothes created by many highly talented designers.

“They are created with this intention in mind, not to represent reality.

“The problem, if there is a problem, comes when people judge themselves and their appearance against the models they see on the pages of a magazine and then feel that in some way they fall short.”

The film, narrated by model Jade Parfitt, has been distributed as fashion week starts in New York, kick-starting a month of international catwalk shows.

 
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Posted by on September 5, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Blogged : New York Fashion Week Daily Preview: Thursday, Sept. 5 #NYFW

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Posted by on September 5, 2013 in Uncategorized